Gildredge Park and Manor Gardens

Location (BN21 1HA)

Situated 700 metres west of Eastbourne Railway Station from where both parks can easily be reached via Upperton Road and The Goffs on the way to Old Town. There a pedestrian link between Manor Gardens and Gildredge Park.

Facilities   

  • café (Seasonal)
  • toilets

  • lawns for informal activities

  • playground

  • bowls

  • tennis public and private (groups are recommended to book.)

  • picnic tables and seats

  • bike racks near bowls club parking

Main attractions

Broad lawns for informal recreation are sheltered by several mature tree belts. There is a children’s playground on the higher edge of the park and also Gildredge Park Bowls Club and tennis courts operated by Tennis in the Park.

History

Purchased by the council from Carew Davis-Gilbert in 1908. As far back as the 1860s discussions took place about retaining this open land between Old Town and the relatively newer development around the railway station and seafront. In 2012 the park became nominated as a Queen Elizabeth II Field.

Facilities   

  • toilets in the adjoining Gildredge Park
  • tennis and basketball courts (it is recommended that groups should book in advance)
  • skate park

Gardens and skate park opening times

Open at 7:30am daily on weekdays, 8:00am at weekends

Closing times

Closing times vary depending on dusk

  • January and December: 4pm
  • February and November: 5.30pm
  • March and October: 6:30pm
  • April and September: 8:00pm
  • May to August: 9:00pm

Main attractions

Attractive lawn areas a complemented with shady trees and a large rose garden.  Herbaceous borders provide summer colour. A lower area has several enclosed courts for tennis and basketball. A skate park with concrete ramps, pipes and other features opened in the spring of 2012. The skate park opening times are the same as for the gardens. 

History

Purchased from the Davis-Gilbert family in 1923.  The former manor house was used as the Towner Art Gallery and local history museum until 2005 when it was closed.  The house was originally built by the Reverend Henry Lushington shortly before 1777. 

Within the gardens are numerous historic features including a small mid to late 18th century thatched hermitage building. In 2012 the park became nominated as a Queen Elizabeth II Field.